Monster from the Past: The X-Files S11x6 “Kitten” Review

February 9, 2018 at 6:51 PM | Posted in TV | 1 Comment
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SPOILER WARNING: This review contains major spoilers of The X-Files season 11. Read at your own risk!

 

This has to be the weakest episode of The X-Files season 11 apart from “My Struggle III.” I was actually bored while watching “Kitten.” The episode delves into the past of FBI assistant director Walter Skinner, specifically his time in the Vietnam War as a teen and how that life-changing event affected him years later.

While “Kitten” is a Skinner-centric episode, it still manages to put Mulder and Scully right in the heart of the story. Also, FBI deputy director Alvin Kersh is back and still has misgivings about Mulder and Scully being back at the bureau. The last time we saw Kersh, he helped the duo escape in season 9.

In the episode, Mulder and Scully are summoned by Kersh who tells them to find Skinner. Apparently, Skinner has gone AWOL. Mulder and Scully’s investigation lead them to a small town in Kentucky called Mud Lick. That’s where they found Skinner who is trying to make things right with his old platoon-mate named John “Kitten” James.

There’s no actual monster or supernatural being in this stand-alone episode. The monster that’s been constantly referred to here is just hallucination. Skinner’s time in the Vietnam War exposed him and his friend John to a weaponized gas from a secret military project called MK Naomi. The gas makes a person hallucinate and see “monsters.” However, the gas didn’t seem to affect a young Skinner that time as his exposure was minimal. It’s his friend John who has had a lot of exposure to the gas. A military cover-up led John to be institutionalized years later and Skinner has been racked with guilt since then that he couldn’t help his friend.

Photo credit: xfilesarchive.com

However, instead of finding John in Kentucky, Skinner meets his friend’s son Davey who lives in a nearby forest. Davey turns out to be the “monster” who wants to avenge his father’s sad fate. He dons a cattle skull mask and kills Vietnam veterans around town by luring them into traps.

Davey’s claims of the government using crops to infect the population with the gas is a trope that’s already been done before in the show. It’s not surprising anymore. Remember the infected bees from previous seasons? And honestly, the pacing of the episode is dragging. Even Skinner’s monologue at the end feels like it doesn’t hold much weight.

“Kitten” is underwhelming and anti-climactic. There is no thrill, no sense of danger. The atmosphere of the episode lacks dread or fear. Davey doesn’t even look and sound threatening. The episode just kind of goes by that it feels like a filler more than anything else.

Photo credit: bleedingcool.com

Open Holes:

  1. If Davey wanted to avenge his father’s misfortune, then why did he hang him to the tree? Was he dead before Davey hang him to the tree?
  2. If Kersh wasn’t happy with Mulder and Scully being back at the bureau, then why didn’t he protest in the first place? Why didn’t he try to prevent it? This was my problem with the season 9 finale when Kersh helped them escape from the corrupted bureau. It just didn’t make sense. Correct me if I’m wrong but as far as I can remember, he was hell-bent on destroying Mulder and Scully in season 9. But towards the series finale, he suddenly helped them escape. Then now, he’s back to hating them. I don’t get it.
  3. So Skinner was already divorced? He used to be married in earlier seasons.
  4. Skinner got out of the hole that quick despite his wound and managed to get ahead of Mulder and Scully to attack Davey? Not buying it.
  5. The mail containing a severed ear just happened to be lying around in Skinner’s home for any intruder to find?

1 Comment »

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  1. Good point about the muddle of the story. Yeah we never know if Skinner got divorce from his wife.


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